Borkware Miniblog

September 29, 2007

Don’t Forget VoodooPad

Filed under: amosxp, programming, Random, work — Mark Dalrymple @ 3:57 pm

With all of the love and attention that Flying Meat’s Acorn is receiving, I figured I would remind folks about VoodooPad.

VoodooPad is a personal Wiki that lets you write stuff and link things around. When it sees words in CamelCapsStyle, it automatically turns it into a link to a new page where you can write more stuff. All pretty standard wiki stuff. It uses the OS X text engine so it has all of the standard word processing features you’ve come to expect, including stuff like tables and lists. This is especially nice because I get a lot of my emacs key bindings along for free. Muscle memory is a wonderful, wonderful thing.

Screen Capture of VoodooPad pro

There are a couple of things I love about VoodooPad : it gets out of my way. I type, I link, I paste in graphics. Gus has obviously paid a lot of attention to the fine details and the app just gets out of my way. It is also very stable. I don’t remember when my last crash was. It just works. Just about every Leopard update makes SnapZ pro freak out and I have to get get new license keys (and then usually something fails on the server side, and takes 20 minutes of dinking around to get a license). Omnigrackle‘s layers get confused and the PDF export dialog has a bug that makes it easy to corrupt your document. Mail.app regularly crashes. But VoodooPad just keeps on chugging along. Oh, and it’s fast, too.

Some folks I know put everything into a single VoodooPad document and use it to store their life (or at least their brains). I typically have one VoodooPad document per project, which usually fall int into one of three broad categories:

Design Document : I have one where I keep my design notes for the Extreme Cross Stitch Design software I’m working on for the Spousal Overunit. I dump figures from OmniGrackle in there, and use class names as the currency of links. This makes it very easy to capture my thinking about the specifics of individual classes, as well as highlighting the interactions between classes. Sometimes I can go for a month or two between working on the App, so having all this stuff handy and interlinked makes it easy to reload my mental state. My winning IronCoder entry included a VoodooPad design document with all sorts of notes. (The entry was Race Against Time, if you’re really bored)

Data Dump and Organizer : I have another one where I keep all my notes, to-dos, transcriptions, and copies of interesting emails for the next edition of AMOSXP. You can see a screenie for this is over to the right. I blort in anything and everything I think might be interesting for the next edition. As I start chewing up a chapter, I have ready access to stuff to consider for exclusion (and stuff to nuke). Sometimes one topic (say an extension to a favorite object-oriented language) is too big for one chapter, so something like its automated memory management technique would make better sense living in the Memory chapter. So I can easily make a note in MemoryChap to say “go look over InThisSetOfNotes for these aspects of rubbish aggregation that would be interesting to talk about here”

Debugging Aid : For projects where I tend to do more debugging than design, I have a VoodooPad document that keeps my debugging notes. Usually for each non-trivial problem there’s a page with a dialog with myself. “So What’s the Problem Fool? Oh, Google Kipple is crashing when you frobulate the giznat. Does it happen all the time? No, just on the second launch. Maybe it’s the SpicyPonyHead user preference Hrm, could be” The dialog format lets me focus my thoughts by making explicit what the next useful piece of information might be, and it makes for easier reading when I need to revisit a bug or if I have to put it down for awhile and return to it later. The linky nature of a wiki makes it easy to put in different branches of investigation and let me revisit what I originally thought was a dead end, but might actually be the path to figuring out the real problem. Because Cocoa class names are CamelCapStyle, class names in stack trace become links. Ppaste in a stack trace and then link out to a class to jot down some relevant notes.

I’m a fan. Check it out.

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4 Comments »

  1. Trivial question – how did you get the black and white toolbar buttons? They aren’t part of the burnt aqua option and I really like the look of them compared to the stock blue and white.

    Comment by Steve — September 30, 2007 @ 3:47 pm

  2. I don’t remember. It may have come with the latest update.

    Comment by Mark Dalrymple — September 30, 2007 @ 6:21 pm

  3. VP makes the toolbar buttons grayscale when you are running on 10.5, since the blue looks like utter crap with the new window styles.

    Bad markd, breaking his NDA! :)

    Comment by ccgus — September 30, 2007 @ 6:22 pm

  4. d’oh! I’ve been found out!

    Comment by Mark Dalrymple — September 30, 2007 @ 6:27 pm


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